Tag Archives: James Corrigan

Much Ado Al Fresco

Cometh June, cometh free theatre at the Dell, Stratford-upon-Avon’s outdoor stage at the upper end of Waterside, by the river.

The opening show, Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing, was presented by a clever mix of RSC staff amateur actors, Shakespeare Institute students and current RSC actors, and directed by James Corrigan – with just one daring week of rehearsals.

Lucy Phelps as Beatrice

A cheerful, large audience came together, picnic blankets, matching hampers, raincoats, brollies, kids, dogs and all.

The play was everywhere, in the midst of the audience, under and on trees, vibrating all around. What joy, dynamic, what a sparkling display of fun ideas. Brilliant work by amateurs and pros alike.

Rhys Bevan as Benedick

Particularly thrilling: Lucy Phelps as Beatrice and Rhys Bevan as Benedick, perfect chemistry and glorious banter.
A female Leonato, Samantha Powell, harvested extra cheers when well-known male lines tipped into hilariousness: “I think this is your daughter?”  “Her father hath many times told me so.”
Also utterly believable in a female version: Don John, the evil brother, played by Grace Martin.

The watch, by Naomi Jacobs, Andrea Moon, Leon Peckson, George Sothcott and Annie Wilson delivered their play-within-the-play as a serious laugh muscle exercise.

With prescience set up under a well leafy roof, a live band accompanied the show, inciting little jigs here and there.

Under the usual conditions of an English summer, two short showers couldn’t be danced away entirely, but the well-prepared audience was not for turning away from this delightful production.

 

 

Well done, everybody.

 

 

 

The Dell season:
https://www.rsc.org.uk/events/the-dell

Julius Caesar in times of political freak waves

Andrew Woodall as Julius Caesar

A production in the context of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s “Roman Season”, Stratford-upon-Avon, 3 March to 9 September 217 in Stratford, in London, Barbican Theatre from 24 November 2017 to 20 January 2018, directed by Angus Jackson.

The plot creeps up, subtly at first, suddenly disturbing, urging, electrifying, surging, subsiding and self-destructive like the conspiracy itself. Near impossible not to feel how closely the emotions and demagogy of classical times match our own world of experience, even if the 21st century’s rhetoric is hardly on the same quality level.

Alex Waldmann as Brutus, Kristin Atherton as Calphurnia, Andrew Woodall as Julius Caesar

On the backdrop of Robert Innes Hopkins’s puristic set, reflecting the Roman Republic’s brutal imperialistic arrogance, including the disturbing sculpture of a lion devouring a horse, the well-known drama unfolds in 2.5 gripping hours.
Brutus, in a highly sensitive interpretation by Alex Waldmann, is, in spite of his distinguished social status, an insecure person, torn between his friendship with Caesar and his sense of duty towards Rome. In his attempts to pacify his conscience, he paves the way towards his so literal end. Waldmann gives him traits of a reluctant hero who cannot forgive himself that there was no clean way out, and he depicts him with a tenderness, as if it were his best friend.
Cassius, the actual instigator of the conspiracy, is, impersonated by Martin Hutson, in wonderfully overstrung hands. A character, utterly unimpeded by scruples of any kind, jumping into action out of personal vexation and political conviction, this Cassius is a conveyor of uneasy feelings.

James Corrigan as Mark Anthony, Alex Waldmann als Brutus

Mark Antony, played by James Corrigan, is the seemingly noble picker-upper of shards, ultimately proven right by fate, at least in the context of these events. Corrigan operates his ice-cold calculation, his targeted manipulation with a gentle air of good-boy innocence. In the unequalled funeral speech, he plays people’s minds like an orchestra’s string section and thus unleashes the civil war.Martin Hutson as Cassius
Julius Caesar, as portrayed by Andrew Woodall, is like a fish out of water in non-military life, used to giving orders, an egomaniac who tries to make up for his health deficiency and lack of diplomatic skills with vanity and obsession with power.
Also impressive: Tom McCall as Casca, the cynic who sees Caesar’s interaction with ordinary people as nothing but theatrical gimmicks, which leaves him with sheer contempt for the populace’s darling.
Portia, wife of Brutus, has little time to express her feelings in this male-dominated play, but Hannah Morris is absolutely amazing in filling this part with life.

Photos by Helen Maybanks (c) RSC
Joseph Adelakun – cobbler / Artemidorus / Dardanus
Ben Allen – Cinna the Conspirator / Titanius
Kristin Atherton – Calphurnia
David Burnett – Marullus, a tribune / Trebonius / Pindarus
James Corrigan – Mark Anthony
Paul Dodds – Metellus Cimber / Clitus
Patrick Drury – Cinna The Poet / Publius
Waleed Elgadi – Soothsayer / Claudius
Martin Hutson – Cassius
Tom Lorcan – Publius
Luke MacGregor – Carpenter / Voluminous / Popilus Lena / Strato
Tom McCall – Casca / Lucilius
Hannah Morish – Portia
Anthony Ofoegbu – Cicero / Ligurius
Dharmesh Patel – Decius Brutus / Messala
Lucy Phelps – Waiting Woman
Jon Tarcy – Octavius
Alex Waldmann – Brutus
Marcello Walton – Lepidus / Flavius
Andrew Woodall – Julius Caesar

16 Citizens of Rome

directed by Angus Jackson

music:
Andrew Stone Fewings- trumpet
Angela Whelan – trumpet
Mark Smith – horn
Kevin Pitt – trombone, euphonium
Ian Foster – tuba, euphonium
Gareth Ellis – keyboard

The Seven Acts of Mercy in merciless times

From Naples 1606 to Bootle near Liverpool 2016 – from food banks and bedroom tax to a painter’s genius and demons spans the bridge that is brought together in an emotionally exhausting, gripping play.the-seven-acts-of-mercy-production-photos_-november-2016_2016_photo-by-ellie-kurttz-_c_-rsc_207955

Caravaggio has just fled from Rome where he is wanted for murder. A church in Naples and a commission to paint the Seven Acts of Mercy become his sanctuary.
In present day Bootle, a young boy and his dying grandfather are only just getting by, until the disastrous consequences of austerity are being handed down to them.the-seven-acts-of-mercy-production-photos_-november-2016_2016_photo-by-ellie-kurttz-_c_-rsc_207927

It is a stroke of genius by playwright Anders Lustgarten to subtly and unpretentiously draw on the 7 Acts of Mercy (feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, shelter the homeless, comfort the sick, visit the imprisoned, bury the dead), including the related sensitivities – in the light of the current political and social climate – as a lifeline for crumbling communities.

The edge-of-the-seat feeling remains strong throughout the play. Fun moments and thrown in edification in art history can only momentarily divert from the sensation of sitting on a dangerously vibrating tectonic fault.

Violent but defenceless, raw as if flayed is Patrick O’Kane’s breathtaking rendition as Caravaggio, a character that won’t let you go.
the-seven-acts-of-mercy-production-photos_-november-2016_2016_photo-by-ellie-kurttz-_c_-rsc_208023His model and kind of friend, prostitute Lavinia, a tough job superbly performed by Allison McKenzie, fences on a very tight rope, vulnerable, proud and scorching.
Further in Naples: Edmund Kingsley as the Marchese, in a delicate portrayal of one of the very few balanced characters in the play. Or is he?
And then James Corrigan as Vincenzo … to be found out.

In Bootle, Tom Georgeson as Grandpa Leon is a deeply touching character trying to pass on hope in hopeless times and he poignantly depicts pride and loss of a worker’s life.
Incredibly talented, young TJ Jones as Mickey carries most of the current day action, and he does it with an ease that would make an old hand proud.
the-seven-acts-of-mercy-production-photos_-november-2016_2016_photo-by-ellie-kurttz-_c_-rsc_208009As scary henchmen, Leon Lopez and Patrick Knowles: sardonic and weirdly funny, in true Pulp Fiction tradition.
Further in Bootle: Gyuri Sarossy as Mickey’s father Lee: an achingly torn figure; Paul McEwan as Damian, recently arrived on the losing end; Paislie Reid and Nicky Priest as Siblings Jennifer and Danny; Lena Kaur as Karen, officiating for the battered Council; Sally Bankes as Sandra at the food bank; Eloise Seeker as Emily, the Labour representative.

A spirited and passionate ensemble play, directed by Deputy Artistic Director Erica Whyman.
The set design is yet another subtle thought amplifier by Tom Piper.
Music by Isobel Waller-Bridge.

From 24th November 2016 to 10th February 2017 at the RSC Swan Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon

Photos by Ellie Kurttz © RSC

More information:  https://www.rsc.org.uk/the-seven-acts-of-mercy

Othello, where everyday horror prevails

Royal Shakespeare Theatre, 4 June – 27 August, 2015, live in cinemas on 26/08/2015

Othello, as per dug out information remembered from school days would look like this: Sneaky Iago drives an easily led black general, Othello, into raging jealousy ending in the murder of his angelic and innocent wife Desdemona. “The green-eyed monster which doth mock the meat it feeds on.” Cleverly described, but probably a little racist in the choice of participants.

Othello production images_ 2015_Photo by Keith Pattison _c_ RSC_Othello.2493In this version directed by Iqbal Khan, the picture is significantly more complex. Iago (Lucian Msamati) is by no means fairer skinned than Othello, and already in the first scene, in a gondola together with Roderigo (James Corrigan), the racist reference to Othello as “thick lips” vexes him personally. His main incitement, however, is the blow to his pride caused by Cassio’s promotion in which he was passed over.
Whilst Desdemona’s father (Brian Protheroe) is protesting to the Duke (Nadia Albina) against the kidnapping of his daughter (Joanna Vanderham), Othello is entrusted with the task of rescuing the state.
Hugh Quarshie, appearing here as an authority figure as well as a sensual and attractive specimen of eye candy in the prime of his life, leaves no doubt as to what attracted Desdemona to him. According to Shakespeare’s words, it was pity, hmmm.

After a successful battle, the victory celebrations take place in Cyprus. Joanna Vanderham’s Desdemona, with her dance, does not fail to impress Cassio (Jacob Fortune-Lloyd), the cause of Iago’s wounded pride. Here already, Othello gives us a clue that jealousy is not entirely beyond him.
The atmosphere reaches its climax when, after a folksong from Zimbabwe – sung by Iago-Lucian Msamati, Cassio and Montano (David Ajoa) engage in a rap battle.

Controlled by Iago, the situation becomes messy and turns into a fight. Suddenly, all the lightness is lost.Othello production images_ 2015_Photo by Keith Pattison _c_ RSC_Othello.3234
The next scene painfully reminds the audience of the fact that the world of the military is not throughout unblemished and heroic: From the “almost venial” fight through to the torture of a prisoner, a backdrop of the ever-present open or subliminal violence is drawn.
From now on, Iago is working relentlessly on the kindling of Othello’s jealousy. When Iago’s wife Emilia (Ayesha Dharker) delivers the requested handkerchief that Desdemona dropped, the fuse is set alight.Othello production images_ 2015_Photo by Keith Pattison _c_ RSC_Othello.2866
The web of deceit, wounded honour and self-righteous violence becomes a death-trap for Desdemona, and not just her.

Electrifying, funny, tragic and absolutely convincing, Lucian Msamati dominates the stage as Iago.
Hugh Quarshie’s representation of Othello in his transformation from being amiable, charming and a little boyish to becoming an obsessed “honour” killer is an achievement of nail-biting authenticity.
Joanna Vanderham dances and sparkles her enchanting Desdemona until she becomes anxious and quiet.
Ayesha Dharker fills the part of Emilia with heart and wit, and in her big scene towards the end, she sets off a firework display of emotions.
A massive kudos to the fantastic music under the direction of Akintayo Akinbode.

Photos by Keith Pattison © RSC

Nadia Albina – Duke of Venice
David Ajao – Montano
Scarlett Brookes – Bianca
James Corrigan – Roderigo
Ayesha Dharker – Emilia
Eva Feiler – Citizen of Venice
Owen Findlay – Gentleman of Cyprus
Jacob Fortune-Lloyd – Cassio
Guy Hughes – Soldier
Rina Mahoney – Citizen of Venice
Lucian Msamati – Iago
Ken Nwosu – Gentleman of Cyprus
Brian Protheroe – Brabantio
Hugh Quarshie – Othello
Jay Saighal – Gentleman of Cyprus
Tim Samuels – Lodovico
Joanna Vanderham – Desdemona

Director – Iqbal Khan
Set Designer – Ciaran Bagnall
Costume designer – Fotini Dimou
Lighting – Ciaran Bagnall
Music – Akintayo Akinbode
Sound – Andrew Franks
Movement – Diane Alison-Mitchell
Fight Director – Kev McCurdy