Tag Archives: Alex Waldmann

Julius Caesar in times of political freak waves

Andrew Woodall as Julius Caesar

A production in the context of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s “Roman Season”, Stratford-upon-Avon, 3 March to 9 September 217 in Stratford, in London, Barbican Theatre from 24 November 2017 to 20 January 2018, directed by Angus Jackson.

The plot creeps up, subtly at first, suddenly disturbing, urging, electrifying, surging, subsiding and self-destructive like the conspiracy itself. Near impossible not to feel how closely the emotions and demagogy of classical times match our own world of experience, even if the 21st century’s rhetoric is hardly on the same quality level.

Alex Waldmann as Brutus, Kristin Atherton as Calphurnia, Andrew Woodall as Julius Caesar

On the backdrop of Robert Innes Hopkins’s puristic set, reflecting the Roman Republic’s brutal imperialistic arrogance, including the disturbing sculpture of a lion devouring a horse, the well-known drama unfolds in 2.5 gripping hours.
Brutus, in a highly sensitive interpretation by Alex Waldmann, is, in spite of his distinguished social status, an insecure person, torn between his friendship with Caesar and his sense of duty towards Rome. In his attempts to pacify his conscience, he paves the way towards his so literal end. Waldmann gives him traits of a reluctant hero who cannot forgive himself that there was no clean way out, and he depicts him with a tenderness, as if it were his best friend.
Cassius, the actual instigator of the conspiracy, is, impersonated by Martin Hutson, in wonderfully overstrung hands. A character, utterly unimpeded by scruples of any kind, jumping into action out of personal vexation and political conviction, this Cassius is a conveyor of uneasy feelings.

James Corrigan as Mark Anthony, Alex Waldmann als Brutus

Mark Antony, played by James Corrigan, is the seemingly noble picker-upper of shards, ultimately proven right by fate, at least in the context of these events. Corrigan operates his ice-cold calculation, his targeted manipulation with a gentle air of good-boy innocence. In the unequalled funeral speech, he plays people’s minds like an orchestra’s string section and thus unleashes the civil war.Martin Hutson as Cassius
Julius Caesar, as portrayed by Andrew Woodall, is like a fish out of water in non-military life, used to giving orders, an egomaniac who tries to make up for his health deficiency and lack of diplomatic skills with vanity and obsession with power.
Also impressive: Tom McCall as Casca, the cynic who sees Caesar’s interaction with ordinary people as nothing but theatrical gimmicks, which leaves him with sheer contempt for the populace’s darling.
Portia, wife of Brutus, has little time to express her feelings in this male-dominated play, but Hannah Morris is absolutely amazing in filling this part with life.

Photos by Helen Maybanks (c) RSC
Joseph Adelakun – cobbler / Artemidorus / Dardanus
Ben Allen – Cinna the Conspirator / Titanius
Kristin Atherton – Calphurnia
David Burnett – Marullus, a tribune / Trebonius / Pindarus
James Corrigan – Mark Anthony
Paul Dodds – Metellus Cimber / Clitus
Patrick Drury – Cinna The Poet / Publius
Waleed Elgadi – Soothsayer / Claudius
Martin Hutson – Cassius
Tom Lorcan – Publius
Luke MacGregor – Carpenter / Voluminous / Popilus Lena / Strato
Tom McCall – Casca / Lucilius
Hannah Morish – Portia
Anthony Ofoegbu – Cicero / Ligurius
Dharmesh Patel – Decius Brutus / Messala
Lucy Phelps – Waiting Woman
Jon Tarcy – Octavius
Alex Waldmann – Brutus
Marcello Walton – Lepidus / Flavius
Andrew Woodall – Julius Caesar

16 Citizens of Rome

directed by Angus Jackson

music:
Andrew Stone Fewings- trumpet
Angela Whelan – trumpet
Mark Smith – horn
Kevin Pitt – trombone, euphonium
Ian Foster – tuba, euphonium
Gareth Ellis – keyboard

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All’s Well That Ends Well – Really?

“All’s Well That Ends Well”, an RSC production at the Theatre Royal in Newcastle begin November

What on earth was Shakespeare thinking, when he took the story about a tricked marriage from Boccaccio’s Decamerone and put it into his incomparable verse?
You might wonder whether he himself had doubts if people were going to buy the plot, when listening to Helena, the female lead, explaining her hidden feelings.

Joanna Horton (Helena)

Joanna Horton (Helena)

There is no envying Joanna Horton for this scene. Helena seems to rather want to be hiding behind the Countess’s (Charlotte Cornwell), her foster mother’s, potted plants, and yet she has to argue her case before the world, why she wants this particular man who is such a bad match for her. You’d like to tell her there are other mothers with interesting sons.
Helena loves her ward’s son, Bertram, who isn’t interested in her.

Alex Waldmann (Bertram), Charlotte Cornwell (Countess of Rossillion)

Alex Waldmann (Bertram), Charlotte Cornwell (Countess of Rossillion)

Alex Waldmann as Bertram, manages to look not a day older than 16, when, as a happy puppy, he is frolicking around with his mates, doesn’t know how to react to his father’s death, and casually moves to the King’s court.

Now Helena takes an initiative that seems a big leap for her character; upon hearing about the King’s (Greg Hicks) illness, she understands that she will be in a position to claim a favour, if she cures him.

Greg Hicks (King of France)

Greg Hicks (King of France)

Greg Hicks’ part is intriguing and has its strongest moments in the King’s illness. When recovered, well, he’s kingly. Greg Hicks is good at that.

When Helena’s plan works out, due to a miraculous medicine, and she is married to the puppy, the young and, understandably, rather frustrated husband, escapes to the wars, the bigger boys’ playground.
Impressively staged: Bertram’s changing into the uniform and the magnificently reduced fight scenes.

Alex Waldmann (Bertram) - raised up, Jonathan Slinger (Parolles) – in background, Daniel Easton, Michael Grady-Hall, Chris Jared, Samuel Taylor (Soldiers)

Alex Waldmann (Bertram) – raised up, Jonathan Slinger (Parolles) – in background, Daniel Easton, Michael Grady-Hall, Chris Jared, Samuel Taylor (Soldiers)

Helena, now deeply frustrated herself, follows Bertram to the city of his garrison, disguised as a pilgrim. Young Diana (fabulous: Natalie Klamar), to whom Bertram has been making advances, plots with Helena, invites him to her bedroom, where Helena, in darkness and without speaking, succeeds in getting pregnant by him.

This second ambush finally has Bertram defeated, he promises eternal love.
A likely result … Shakespeare himself seems happy to sow some doubt regarding lasting success. The King closes his part with the words:
“All yet seems well; and if it end so meet,
The bitter past, more welcome is the sweet.” 5.3.43

In an era when marriages for romantic reasons were far from being standard, these doubts must have worked in an even more conniving way than they do today. It was a difficult source material for a difficult comedy. Comedy? Truly Shakespeare.

This is a play that isn’t staged very often, and, even in this great production by Nancy Meckler, the plot feels strangely awkward.
Kudos to Joanna Horton, Alex Waldmann, Jonathan Slinger, Charlotte Cornwall, Natalie Klamar, Karen Archer, David Fielder and all the others who made this production well worth seeing and food for thought.

Alex Waldmann (Bertram)

Alex Waldmann (Bertram)

Jonathan Slinger (Parolles)

Jonathan Slinger (Parolles)

All’s Well will be on stage  at the Theatre Royal, Newcastle from 5 – 9 November.

photos by: Ellie Kurttz

First published in German on 19/09/2013 by artyviews

Hamlet, my Hamlet

“How shall I hold back my soul that it doesn’t touch yours?” This question from Rilke‘s Love Song arises in a worried tone, here. Hamlet is the emotional highlight this year’s RSC productions. This production by David Farr hits the audience’s nerve where it is raw.

Jonathan Slinger (Hamlet)

Jonathan Slinger (Hamlet)

Elsinore in the paltry and dismal atmosphere of an old gym, soulless courtiers, phrases and masks as default mode…  Hamlet, the son of a murdered father can’t make up his mind to perform the promised revenge, and by his not-acting destroys the lives of practically everybody involved. Traditionally, he is a hesitator-too-much-thinker, maybe weak of character, overly cautious.
Jonathan Slinger opens up an abyss of depression, the symptoms of which have an effect that is as much self-destructive as family-destructive. Slinger’s Hamlet hits deep, and he does so over 3.5 hours.

Pippa Nixon (Ophelia)

Pippa Nixon (Ophelia)

Ophelia (Pippa Nixon) has no chance to distance herself. She invests her entire, innocent love and burns herself, body and soul, on her feelings. Pippa’s state of being lost, when her reason is bowled over, and her saved solitude in her grave, that remains visible through to the end, are truly breathtaking.

Greg Hicks (Claudius)

Greg Hicks (Claudius)

Father’s ghost and Uncle Claudius are taken to new dimensions. Claudius comes over as one of these self-justifying offenders who keep convincing themselves that all their evil deeds happened for the common good. Hick’s body language enriches Shakespeare’s Hamlet by a full chapter of cues for spectators.

Hamlet’s friend Horatio is a further highlight. Alex Waldmann brings warmth to a world without a perspective.

Alex Waldmann (Horatio)

Alex Waldmann (Horatio)

A brilliant scene of distance from emotional horror and a relaxed view is due to David Fielder as the gravedigger.

It’s an ensemble in which each individual would deserve a mention, not least Robin Soans as Polonius, Charlotte Cornwell as Gertrude …
the all surpassing impression, however, that’s Jonathan Slinger’s masterpiece – Hamlet, my Hamlet.

Jonathan Slinger (Hamlet)

Jonathan Slinger (Hamlet)

Hamlet will be on stage in the Theatre Royal, Newcastle Fri 18 October to Sat 26 October 2013.
Video clip

Photos by Keith Pattison

This post was first published in German on 13/08/2013 here

Shakespearean Folk in the Forest of Arden

As You Like It production
of the Royal Shakespeare TheatreAYLI-6382, at the Theatre Royal in Newcastle

Wanderer between worlds, fugitives as beacons of hope, metamorphosis to a more heartfelt existence under the influence of nature… Country lad William Shakespeare, living in London’s big city hustle and bustle, certainly knew the longing he was writing about.

This production by Swedish director Maria Aberg bathes the affectionate Shakespeare comedy in an ambiance of festival, midsummer and heavenly lightness. Its atmosphere floats on dreamlike music written by composer and folk-pop singer Laura Marling.

Rosalind, the surpassing Pippa Nixon, flees, together with her cousin (Joanna Horton), from her reckless uncle’s court, shortly before also her heartthrob Orlando (Alex Waldmann) seeks refuge in the Forest of Arden, due to his brother’s murderous plans.
This is where already Rosalind’s banished father is hiding with his entourage. Rosalind, disguised as a man, comes across Orlando, who doesn’t recognize her, and teaches him the art of charming a woman.

Pippa Nixon does not only conquer Orlando – with her incredible diversity of expression, she juggles with the audience’s emotions and expectations, flying them high, letting them drop, catching them in such swing and momentum and spinning them up again, that just watching the play feels like dancing.
Alex Waldmann is a current day Orlando, hoodie wearer, misunderstood, exuberantly young and intoxicatingly physical. He displays his emotional worlds, their development and their variety in ways so touching that you’d wish you had individual scene photos for each single one of them.
Celia, Rosalind’s cousin and soulmate, is played by a fabulous Joanna Horton who credits this often neglected part with the fascination and warmth of a funny very best friend.
Touchstone the jester ensures, portrayed by Nicholas Tennant, continuous tears of laughter, and Jaques, his alter ego, in Oliver Ryan’s interpretation, comes over as a lovable drop-out comedian.

Alex Waldman (Orlando) and Pippa Nixon (Rosalind) In background David Fielder (Adam)

Alex Waldman (Orlando) and Pippa Nixon (Rosalind)
In background David Fielder (Adam)

As You Like It is going to be on stage in the Theatre Royal in Newcastle from Tue 29 October – Sat 2 November 2013.
A treat not to be missed.
(First published in German on 26/04/2013 under http://artyviews.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/shakespeare-woodstock-im-wald-von-arden/)

Alex Waldman (Orlando)

Alex Waldman (Orlando)

Pippa Nixon (Rosalind)

Pippa Nixon (Rosalind)

Nicholas Tennant (Touchstone)

Nicholas Tennant (Touchstone)

Oliver Ryan (Jaques)

Oliver Ryan (Jaques)

 

 

Photographer:  Keith Pattison

 

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